New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

FLO Product Support, FAQ, Cycling, Triathlon, Etc.

New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby legday » August 21st, 2016, 7:22 pm

Got my new Flow 60 front and 90 rear yesterday. (Yea!) Sweet wheels, but my drool subsided as I began to attempt Conti 4000 tire installation. Tried every trick in the book and each one failed. Decided to bite the bullet and take them to the LBS. The LBS guy was up for a challenge and after 20 mins ended up in the same place as I had. He enlisted another LBS pro and then a third to muscle the skins on.

Thankfully they were successful, but any bad encounters on race day, the fat lady sings and it's game over for me. So how in the world do others make a quick change? Is there a more slippery set of skins to use instead of my Conti 4k's?

Thanks!

LD
legday
 
Posts: 2
Joined: August 21st, 2016, 5:24 am

Re: New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby Chris Thornham » August 23rd, 2016, 11:25 am

legday wrote:Got my new Flow 60 front and 90 rear yesterday. (Yea!) Sweet wheels, but my drool subsided as I began to attempt Conti 4000 tire installation. Tried every trick in the book and each one failed. Decided to bite the bullet and take them to the LBS. The LBS guy was up for a challenge and after 20 mins ended up in the same place as I had. He enlisted another LBS pro and then a third to muscle the skins on.

Thankfully they were successful, but any bad encounters on race day, the fat lady sings and it's game over for me. So how in the world do others make a quick change? Is there a more slippery set of skins to use instead of my Conti 4k's?

Thanks!

LD


Do you have the Carbon Clincher model or the Aluminum + Carbon model of our wheels? To be honest, I'm quite surprised it took 3 people to put a tire on. I've never heard of this. Were you using tire levers? I've pasted a video below with our recommendations for installing tires. With that, I'll add that tubeless ready rims should have the clincher beads seated at the bottom of the "trough" to make installing the tire easier. If you have your beads up on the shoulders of the rim bed, you aren't doing yourself any favors.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_Cp0TRWnx4
Chris Thornham
FLO Cycling: http://www.flocycling.com
FLO Blog: http://bit.ly/b3Zlpq | Twitter: http://bit.ly/bOQ08x | Facebook: http://bit.ly/d8KDhI
Chris Thornham
Site Admin
 
Posts: 566
Joined: March 2nd, 2012, 3:35 pm
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada

Re: New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby legday » August 23rd, 2016, 7:22 pm

I have the Carbon Clinchers. I did watch the video, and normally do this myself. Over the years picking up tricks for those tight tire/rim combinations, but I couldn't put these on. It wasn't close. So I to them up to the LBS. They did all the usual things you do to fit and first one guy then enlisting a second then a third. Of course placing the beads as deep in the center of the wheel as possible, just as I had done. They tried levers at first but decided that they should just pull the bead over the edge of the rim at the last point. Two guys held the bead on the left and right of the main portion and the third positioned himself on the other side and pulled the bead as the others pushed. It popped into place after this method and produced some very red hands.
legday
 
Posts: 2
Joined: August 21st, 2016, 5:24 am

Re: New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby VKRVT55 » November 11th, 2016, 10:12 am

There are a few additional tips worth trying, especially when mounting new tires onto FLO rims (we have almost full range of FLO wheels, and use 23mm GP4000S on all of them).
1 - New tires will be tougher to mount that used ones, as they stretch a bit after use. If you have the time, mount your new tire on some other wheel that you are familiar with and find more easy to work with, inflate it and leave it for a week or so before removing it and mounting it to your FLO wheel. The tire will be a bit stretched now, making the job easier.
2 - As mentioned elsewhere, a light dusting of corn starch or talcum powder will help everything move around more easily. Don't overdo it though.
3 - The trick I use: As you get close to the 'hard part' (getting that last bit of the bead over the rim), go back to the opposite side of the rim (the point at which you started mounting the tire) and squeeze the beads of the tire together into the centre well of the rim, working your way around, and back to the point where you're stuck. This is made easier if you don't have too much air in the tube to begin with, just a bit of air is all you need to give the tube the slightest bit of shape. The FLO carbon rim seems to be a bit more of a challenge than the aluminum rim, I guess the centre well isn't as deep on those.
- Believe it or not, I do not even use tire levers to mount tires - I use the palms of both hands to put pressure evenly along the unmounted section of tire, use my fingers to grip the rim and simply roll that last section of tire over the rim and into place. Doing the previous step (centering the bead in the rim well) facilitates this. At nearly 60 yrs old, I am not Hercules or anything. Technique is everything!
On a related note, I disagree with the generally-accepted advice on mounting tires: I think (and do) finish the job at the valve stem, not start it there. By finishing at the valve stem you can push the stem partially up into the tire and decrease the chance that the tube will be pinched between the tire and rim as you pop that last bit into place. IIRC, this actually used to be the accepted practice until about 10 yrs ago, go figure.
Hope it helps,
Chris H.
VKRVT55
 
Posts: 3
Joined: December 12th, 2014, 7:42 am

Re: New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby Chris Thornham » November 11th, 2016, 11:31 am

VKRVT55 wrote:There are a few additional tips worth trying, especially when mounting new tires onto FLO rims (we have almost full range of FLO wheels, and use 23mm GP4000S on all of them).
1 - New tires will be tougher to mount that used ones, as they stretch a bit after use. If you have the time, mount your new tire on some other wheel that you are familiar with and find more easy to work with, inflate it and leave it for a week or so before removing it and mounting it to your FLO wheel. The tire will be a bit stretched now, making the job easier.
2 - As mentioned elsewhere, a light dusting of corn starch or talcum powder will help everything move around more easily. Don't overdo it though.
3 - The trick I use: As you get close to the 'hard part' (getting that last bit of the bead over the rim), go back to the opposite side of the rim (the point at which you started mounting the tire) and squeeze the beads of the tire together into the centre well of the rim, working your way around, and back to the point where you're stuck. This is made easier if you don't have too much air in the tube to begin with, just a bit of air is all you need to give the tube the slightest bit of shape. The FLO carbon rim seems to be a bit more of a challenge than the aluminum rim, I guess the centre well isn't as deep on those.
- Believe it or not, I do not even use tire levers to mount tires - I use the palms of both hands to put pressure evenly along the unmounted section of tire, use my fingers to grip the rim and simply roll that last section of tire over the rim and into place. Doing the previous step (centering the bead in the rim well) facilitates this. At nearly 60 yrs old, I am not Hercules or anything. Technique is everything!
On a related note, I disagree with the generally-accepted advice on mounting tires: I think (and do) finish the job at the valve stem, not start it there. By finishing at the valve stem you can push the stem partially up into the tire and decrease the chance that the tube will be pinched between the tire and rim as you pop that last bit into place. IIRC, this actually used to be the accepted practice until about 10 yrs ago, go figure.
Hope it helps,
Chris H.


Great advice. Thank you for the tips. I personally do not finish at the valve, but if that works for you, then that's perfect.

Take care,
Chris Thornham
FLO Cycling: http://www.flocycling.com
FLO Blog: http://bit.ly/b3Zlpq | Twitter: http://bit.ly/bOQ08x | Facebook: http://bit.ly/d8KDhI
Chris Thornham
Site Admin
 
Posts: 566
Joined: March 2nd, 2012, 3:35 pm
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada

Re: New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby spudman1 » December 13th, 2016, 1:44 pm

My experience with the Flo 45s was very good. I took my time and got the new 23mm Conti on the front with just my hands for the first time ever. For me that is quite a feat. I've been known to break a tire tool trying to muscle a Continental on my old bike. (They were 650c wheels, so no direct comparison.)

My back tire is a 25mm GPII. It took me using a tool for the last bit. For both of these tires I took them out of the box and unfolded them and left them in a warm room for a day. Then I tried to stretch them just a bit with my hands and a foot before trying to install them. I don't know if this helped or not, but like I said the install was very easy. The only problem was I installed the front tire with the direction arrow going the wrong way. I know this doesn't really make a difference, but I'm just OCD enough that I will have to do it over.
spudman1
 
Posts: 1
Joined: November 28th, 2016, 12:56 pm

Re: New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby Chris Thornham » December 15th, 2016, 1:45 pm

spudman1 wrote:My experience with the Flo 45s was very good. I took my time and got the new 23mm Conti on the front with just my hands for the first time ever. For me that is quite a feat. I've been known to break a tire tool trying to muscle a Continental on my old bike. (They were 650c wheels, so no direct comparison.)

My back tire is a 25mm GPII. It took me using a tool for the last bit. For both of these tires I took them out of the box and unfolded them and left them in a warm room for a day. Then I tried to stretch them just a bit with my hands and a foot before trying to install them. I don't know if this helped or not, but like I said the install was very easy. The only problem was I installed the front tire with the direction arrow going the wrong way. I know this doesn't really make a difference, but I'm just OCD enough that I will have to do it over.


Thanks for the feedback!
Chris Thornham
FLO Cycling: http://www.flocycling.com
FLO Blog: http://bit.ly/b3Zlpq | Twitter: http://bit.ly/bOQ08x | Facebook: http://bit.ly/d8KDhI
Chris Thornham
Site Admin
 
Posts: 566
Joined: March 2nd, 2012, 3:35 pm
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada

Re: New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby AlathIN » January 11th, 2017, 6:06 am

Another n=1 data point:

I got a 60-90 carbon clincher set and put new gp4k2 25mm on them. The front went about like always for me, had to use a lever for the very last bit. The 90mm rear was tighter than average - had to use a lever AND it was tight enough to be difficult to get the lever in for the last bit. But I've had plenty of other tire/rim combos equally tight or moreso in the past. Worst I remember was a pair of Conti touring tires and Bontrager rims - the Conti/Flo combo was nowhere near as stubborn as those. I am guessing there is a +/- variance on all rims and tires, and when you get a rim on the big end of normal and a tire on the small end you are in for a struggle.

PS Spudman - if you got the rolling direction wrong on a front wheel, can't you just flip the whole wheel and tire? Maybe I am missing something?
AlathIN
 
Posts: 11
Joined: November 9th, 2016, 7:51 am

Re: New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby Chris Thornham » January 12th, 2017, 2:43 pm

AlathIN wrote:Another n=1 data point:

I got a 60-90 carbon clincher set and put new gp4k2 25mm on them. The front went about like always for me, had to use a lever for the very last bit. The 90mm rear was tighter than average - had to use a lever AND it was tight enough to be difficult to get the lever in for the last bit. But I've had plenty of other tire/rim combos equally tight or moreso in the past. Worst I remember was a pair of Conti touring tires and Bontrager rims - the Conti/Flo combo was nowhere near as stubborn as those. I am guessing there is a +/- variance on all rims and tires, and when you get a rim on the big end of normal and a tire on the small end you are in for a struggle.

PS Spudman - if you got the rolling direction wrong on a front wheel, can't you just flip the whole wheel and tire? Maybe I am missing something?


Thanks for the input. Sounds like you had a very typical tire installation where you need a tire lever just at the end. This happens more so with new tires.

Have a great day,
Chris Thornham
FLO Cycling: http://www.flocycling.com
FLO Blog: http://bit.ly/b3Zlpq | Twitter: http://bit.ly/bOQ08x | Facebook: http://bit.ly/d8KDhI
Chris Thornham
Site Admin
 
Posts: 566
Joined: March 2nd, 2012, 3:35 pm
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada

Re: New Flo 60's & 90's Tire Changing

Postby Comlite31 » April 19th, 2017, 9:24 pm

Your question helped me.
Comlite31
 
Posts: 1
Joined: April 19th, 2017, 2:47 am


Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest